Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything 2019-01-10

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything Rating: 7,2/10 1419 reviews

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

In a typical sumo tournament, each wrestler participates in fifteen matches. According to Levitt and Dubner, those experts were wrong. Because each member hopes to be the next J. On top of that, the percentage of abortions obtained by teens dropped steadily over the next two decades before stabilizing at about 20 percent. Are they positive or negative incentives? The authors note that most of the characteristics associated with higher student test scores are determined long before the parents actually start parenting. But ultimately I think most of what Leavitt claims is crap.

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Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

But for all of the authors' clever use of data and scientific methods to reach conclusions both entertaining and accessible to the layperson, they frequently make missteps that undermine the scientific premises on which the whole enterprise is based. Levitt is not a typical economist. Hunt for insights where normality, received wisdom or expectations are disrupted, and then map the incentive structure for the behaviour. In the 1960s, some states began to reverse their previous restrictions on abortion. I almost finished but couldn't do it in the end. What is the likelihood of their success? I didn't stick around for the rest.

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Freakonomics A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of...

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

If there were indeed such an agreement between the wrestlers, one would expect to see the winner of the first match lose the next tournament match at a rate of about 80 percent—a perfect symmetry that suggests an equitable transaction between the two wrestlers. Dubner, it opened my eyes to the most interesting approach to the world. A great deal of the book is devoted to describing the conditions and results of various experiments and studies. The truth about real-estate agents. I recommend 'Bad Science' by Ben Goldacre. I love that they promote use of numbers and statistics to explore ideas in an attempt to find the truth.

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Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything [Speed Summary]

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

In particular, their analysis rests on the ability to identify uninjured children in vehicles that were involved in fatal crashes. For example, when I first started to learn about supply and demand… 1538 Words 7 Pages puzzling, but the answer is provided in the book Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. But as the authors say, conventional wisdom is often wrong. Verbose, repetitive, contradictory: a book of 200-pages that could be condensed to 3-5 pages. What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? Supreme Court, where in 1973, the Court voted 7-2 to strike down the Texas law.


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Book Review: Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

For example, in the early 1990s, media outlets reported extensively on the rapidly increasing crime rate across the country. In particular, their analysis rests on the ability to identify uninjured children in vehicles that were involved in fatal crashes. A negative social incentive might include the banning of certain behaviors, such as smoking, in public places. By exporting more goods than it imports, a nation could gain wealth from other countries while still keeping its own wealth within its borders. Crime rates had been rising for decades, and people were really worried about what would happen if the trend continued. Way to much of the book is spent praising Levitt.

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Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

It is true that readers of this book will be armed with enough riddles and stories to last a thousand cocktail parties. Steven Levitt, through devilishly clever and clear-eyed thinking, shows how to see through all the clutter. But given the right data, I have little doubt that I could figure out the answer. Another nagging problem with the book is that the explanations offered for people's behavior often rely on wild speculation about what those people were thinking. But scientific research is filled with all sorts of conditions, caveats, and clarifications that do not translate well into simple bits of engaging prose. A human-rights crusader named Stetson Kennedy decided to go undercover and join the Klan, hoping to gain enough information to end the organization's reign of terror over those it persecuted. By evaluating each of these factors, the authors rule out four of them as possible contributors to the drop in crime.

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Freakonomics : a rogue economist explores the hidden side of everything : Levitt, Steven D : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

Their students were retested, and their answer sheets were collected directly instead of being left with the suspicious teachers. And in the face of the Internet, their informational advantage is shrinking every day-as evidenced by, among other things, the falling price of coffins and life-insurance premiums. Levitt does not make mistakes like that, which is one reason I urge people to read this book, even though much that is crucial has been left out or ignored. Click on the cover image above to read some pages of this book! Topics are interested and taken from daily life observations. In the mid-1800s, through a movement largely supported by feminists such as Susan B. With them having similar ideals about… 1585 Words 7 Pages preferred by economist, Steven D.

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Freakonomics, A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

Dubner lives in New York City. How much do parents really matter? Levitt the other author is a journalist, Stephen J. Even with no one watching over the bagel transactions, Feldman averages close to a 90 percent payment rate—that is, a 10 percent theft rate. This raises the question, what can an economist say that is so interesting that so many people want to read it? Understand the incentives at play, and you understand the behaviour. But the net effect is likely to be more subtle than that. The underlying principles are the same, however, at least when it comes to analyzing society. In Collapse, Diamond concentrates on several societies that have failed throughout history—including the Anasazi and the Greenland Norse—and argues that a better understanding of our environment might help prevent similar collapses in the future.

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