George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I. 9781400043637: George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I 2019-01-12

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I Rating: 4,2/10 1897 reviews

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I by Miranda Carter

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

Some felt they deserved each other, but she did at least make life with the ex-kaiser a little easier. Because they attacked his wife. He grew up hungering both to belong to this grand tradition and to outshine it. Nevertheless, it's a riveting account of all the many and varied roads that led to the Great War. Officer casualties were enormously high—not least because of their habit of leading charges dressed in their brightest uniforms. In any case, it hurt my father that Britain had not raised a hand to save his Cousin Nicky.

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Book Review: 'George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War One' by Miranda Carter

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

Through the last months of 1916 and into 1917, person after person tried to alert Nicholas to the bomb under his throne—how angry the country was and how the malign influence of Rasputin and the disastrous meddling of the empress were making it so much worse. On the ninth the latest war minister told the kaiser that the army would not fight for him if there was a civil war, and he must abdicate. Women over thirty got the vote in 1918. It is too horrible and shows what fiends those Bolshevists are. Wilhelm, like Nicholas, had no idea of the potential consequences of his actions. He went to Buchanan, who replied—according to Kerensky with tears in his eyes—that the British government had withdrawn its offer of asylum.

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EPILOGUE

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

It was another great irony entirely lost on King George that Lloyd George, the man whose politics were anathema to him, was the man who kept his throne secure. And since the war had been fought with imperial troops—Canadian, antipodean, South African and Indian soldiers had all contributed—it looked like an imperial victory, a triumph binding the empire more closely than ever. He slapped the King of Bulgaria on the bottom and then spread rumors that he was a hermaphrodite. Political disputes and family disputes are intertwined. One British observer 37 saw 1,800 new recruits arrive at the front without a single rifle. Nor did I realize that his hated wife had such power towards the end of their reign, that she was dismissing ministers right and left, in a fashion that would have been comical had it not been so tragic. I would have to rewind.

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What Happens When a Bad

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

When Sir Richard Haldane, former war minister, founder of the London School of Economics and well-known Germanophile, was hounded out of office by a hysterical campaign in the right-wing press, George awarded him the Order of Merit. A month later, in August, the family were sent to Tobolsk, a small backwater in western Siberia. The Russian war effort went disastrously wrong within three months. Not only did it not work, but it spread hemophilia through the royal houses. The threads all pull together right at the end, and all I wanted to do was immediately read it over. As with Wilhelm, the worst news was kept from Nicholas.

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George, Nicholas and Wilhelm by Miranda Carter

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

This is a rather dry read, but good for informational value. You know, my dear Nicky, how devoted I am to you and I can assure you that my Government regards your Country with equally strong feelings of friendship. That these three absurd men could ever have held the fate of Europe in their hands is a fact as hilarious as it is terrifying. Nevertheless, it's a riveting account of all the many and varied roads that led to the Great War. Carter has provided a carefully braided history of three remarkably similar cousins.

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A WAR: 1914

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

His actions towards Great Britain — I love you! There was nowhere for them to go. Not an expert, just a fan. On 8 March 1917 by the Western calendar, an angry group of women textile workers marched up Nevsky Prospekt demanding bread. I enjoyed the original enough that I'd always wanted to read the entire thing. Someone, it was felt, should be called to account for the carnage. Raising herself from her sickbed, she decided to give Russia what she clearly believed would be a master class in autocracy. Of all the ways that man has devised for cornering power, none is as breathtaking as the hereditary monarchy.

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Buy George, Nicholas and Wilhelm : Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I by Miranda Carter (2011, Paperback) online

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

Prussian wives were supposed to be silent and submissive; there was none of the leeway allowed in Britain for an intelligent, educated woman to shine. Wilhelm was a thorough narcissist, and you can certainly see how the actions he took resemble trump's actions. It had long been dominated by the Junkers, and was the heart of Prussian conservatism. What is so lovely about my experience with this book is that I happened to stumble upon it in my library's collection when I was browsing the biography section. After three years at war, the divisions in German society were creating their own chaos; the country was riven with strikes and protests against falling wages and food shortages.

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Buy George, Nicholas and Wilhelm : Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I by Miranda Carter (2011, Paperback) online

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

The subject of Mussolini, who had just sent an Italian army into Ethiopia, was raised. He entertained himself by digging little trenches and diverting a dam. Carter has clearly not bitten off more than she can chew for she -- as John Updike once wrote of Gunter Grass -- 'chews it enthusiastically before our eyes. On 12 March the Petrograd garrisons mutinied and joined the revolution. A voluntary abdication might help to stabilize the situation. As her story unfolds, we see just how determinative — and sometimes irrelevant — these turned out to be. Combined with the gradual political changes of the previous twenty years, it made him a far more marginal figure than his father or grandmother had been, and he found himself presiding over social and political changes of which he utterly disapproved.

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George, Nicholas and Wilhelm : three royal cousins and the road to World War I (Book, 2011) [www.socialinterview.com]

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

The Dutch government rejected every attempt to extradite the former kaiser; there were laws in Holland protecting aliens who had sought sanctuary there on political grounds. At the same time, Carter weaves through their stories a riveting account of the events that led to World War I, showing how the personal and the political interacted, sometimes to devastating effect. Where the king was able to exercise some influence, it was to potentially tragic effect. Though his ministry was dominated by Conservatives, his own enormous popularity and his record of social amelioration gave him credibility with the strikers, and his political instincts led him to meet them halfway, while other European governments responded with heavy-handed repression. But the bestowal upon her imperial grandson of the honorary title admiral of the Royal Navy gave the queen if not Gilbert and Sullivan cause for regret. The horrors of war took all three by surprise. The attending nurse had to rub and slap him repeatedly to make him cry.

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George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I (Hardcover)

George, Nicholas and Wilhelm: Three Royal Cousins and the Road to World War I

Each led a country out of the Victorian age and into a modern world that none of them was equipped to handle. They dutifully supported their troops during World War One, pinning medals on soldiers while obliviously living well. Miranda Carter, using a plethora of primary and secondary sources, brings this period to vivid life. On the one hand, it was a rich state with an impressive civil service, a fine education system, and a fast-growing industrial heartland in the Western Rhineland. How did these three leaders, King, Czar and Kaiser come to be shaped? Rather than take a long life, and write an exhausting study of the subject, they're taking a relatively small bit of time and concentrate on specific events. It is a complex and enthralling history of dynastic relations and dysfunctional royal families, of misguided and competing colonial interests, of the emerging dominance of the media and popular opinion leading to the weakening of royal power, and of tensions between England, Germany, and Russia that deepened and spread for 30 years before war broke out. But of course, little more than a dozen years after Victoria's 1901 funeral, attended by a host of these relatives, cousin was pitted against cousin in unprecedentedly hideous global combat.

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