Hey, Al. Hey, Al (Book, 1986) [www.socialinterview.com] 2019-01-09

Hey, Al Rating: 6,6/10 346 reviews

Hey, Al by Arthur Yorinks

Hey, Al

This book is wonderfully written and definitely deserves the Caldecott Medal. Get the book from Amazon. When a giant toucan pokes his head in the bathroom window one day and offers to take them on a tropical vacation, it seems like a wonderful opportunity. However, the room is very cramped and their life is a struggle. I love all the illustrations.

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Hey, Al and the Quirky Choice — The Horn Book

Hey, Al

Much thanks to Izzy, who really enjoyed this book, as reported by Chandra. Al works hard, but struggles to have a good lifestyle for him and Eddie. Tomorrow, come and be my guest. I think I would have too. Get prepared for one surreal yet adventurous journey! Published by , it was the recipient of the for in 1987. Probably the same thing Al and Eddie did, unless you'd happened to finish this book first. And none of the reviews heaped the sort of praise on Hey, Al that critics had given previous books by the pair.

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New & Used Books, Textbooks, Music & Movies

Hey, Al

Here she examines the 1987 winner, Hey, Al Farrar , written by Arthur Yorinks and illustrated by Richard Egielski, as a come-out-of-nowhere winner. The illustrators did a great job of using colors for the various birds throughout the book. Reading about Al as he learns those lessons will allow children to learn the same lessons without having to experience the hardship and gain an optimistic mentality. There was some controversy surrounding Hey, Al winning the fiftieth Caldecott medal. A wonderful and imaginative story to show that one can find happiness with what they've got.

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Hey, Al (Book, 2012) [www.socialinterview.com]

Hey, Al

Don't aspire beyond your station, or be content with what you have? This book is definitely an entertaining story. Didn't like this one all that much for whatever reason. When Al and Eddie find a perfect paradise, they feel like giving up their hard work and small apartment are totally worth it. The two paired together to make the award book Hey, Al. Personal response: This book was really cute and I loved the relationship between the man and the dog. I rated this book a five, because it seems to be an easy read for children, and children can glance at these pictures for hours without feeling any boredom.

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Hey, Al by Arthur Yorinks

Hey, Al

Then, when Al and Eddie enter the real world again, the illustrations return to being surrounded by the border and plain. Al and Eddie are unhappy living in this cramped place, and long for a house with a yard. The illustrations were pretty nice, but I found one illustration especially disturbing, and that picture was of the dodo bird having hands underneath it's feathers, that was just a tad bit too odd. Write a descriptive story about what their fantasy world would look like. I thought the ending was a little too pat, but it is a kids' book so I guess I wouldn't want anything tragic to happen. This is story about a janitor his pet dog who leave their small apartment after a bird offers them a life in paradise. I understand why they are tired of working so hard and empathize with them.

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Hey, Al by Arthur Yorinks

Hey, Al

From personal experience and the news, I relate to Al and Eddie when they struggle to have a good, comfortable life. Said head bore an uncanny resemblance to Maurice Sendak, an observation that those in the know loved to point out. Al a Janitor living in the big city. What would have happened if the story ended differently? After they start to turn into birds, the characters decide that this paradise is not all that they expected and their old life is missed. If needed you can go back to the web site from the beginning to look at the picture of your bird again. Al is a janitor and they live, work, and eat together. Besides that fact, Hey, Al is simply a strange picture book.

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Hey, Al by Arthur Yorinks

Hey, Al

It won an international prize from Biennial of Illustrations Bratislava, making Egielski the only American artist to be recognized in 1985. They complement the plot nicely, and enhance it greatly. Both verbally and pictorially, the relationship between the friends is funny and touching. One day a large colorful bird appears at their bathroom window and invites them to a land where there is no worries or carries. The pen makes the details precise and real.

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Hey, Al (Book, 2012) [www.socialinterview.com]

Hey, Al

He mostly uses italics to emphasize words throughout book, but does not use any other figurative language or other type of writing style. Anyway, fantasy happens, change happens, and we all learn the valuable lesson to appreciate what we have. A cautionary tale about being grateful for the life you have, even if you have to work hard and you don't get everything you dream of. We've read this one a few times and we've enjoyed reading it together. The illustrations are also a very good size, they show all of the detail of the scene without looking overwhelming or taking away from the words written on the page.

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Hey, Al by Arthur Yorinks

Hey, Al

His dog Eddie tags along too, and they realize it is not all it is cracked up to be. And this is where the story Al the janitor doesn't mind working hard all day, even though he hardly makes enough to pay for a tiny studio and keep food in his and his dog's mouths. I also enjoy that this book can create an interesting discussion about personal values. The illustrations scream to be looked over and studied for longer than a few seconds. The illustrations are heavily detailed and creative. I don't think I would read it too super young kids, even though the writing is quite basic.

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