Outwitting the Gestapo. Outwitting the Gestapo 2019-01-12

Outwitting the Gestapo Rating: 6,4/10 799 reviews

9780803259232: Outwitting the Gestapo

Outwitting the Gestapo

Author by : H R. I believe if her story had been told by someone else, it would have shown the reader much more of her bravery and leadership, but it felt many times as if she downplayed her role in the Resistance. Lucie's was a part of the Resistance. Lucie Aubrac's book does that. Written as a memoir, Lucie Aubrac reveals the barbaric atrocities by Barbie, the butcher of Lyon. Through heroic journeys through unspeakable danger, Lucie must rescue the ones she loves while protecting an unborn child due during a time in history where everything is madness. I told them, long ago, that he is my husband.

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Book Review: Outwitting the Gestapo by Lucie Aubrac

Outwitting the Gestapo

This is one to pick up and hopefully let people know we should never forget this dark part of history so it will never happen again. Finally, the English translation is subperb. The tone is flat, the very antithesis of dramatic. Subscribe If you like what you're reading online, why not take advantage of our subscription and get unlimited access to all of Times Higher Education's content? Outwitting the Gestapo is Lucie's harrowing account of her participation in the Resistance: of the months when, though pregnant, she planned and took part in raids to free comrades-including her husband, under Nazi death sentence-from the prisons of Klaus Barbie, the infamous Butcher of Lyon. Seriously, there's a book and I guess, a movie about Lucie Aubrac aka: Catherine, Lucie Bernard, Lucie Samuels, etc for good reason. As for the history class Aubrac is teaching during the Resistance, she is addressing ancient history and her Jewish students light up when they hear the names Mesopotamia, Babylon, Nebuchadnezzar, Abraham, Moses, etc.


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Outwitting the Gestapo by Lucie Aubrac

Outwitting the Gestapo

Remember the old saying that Ginger Rogers did everything Fred did only backwards and in high heels? Some of the most moving passages have nothing to do with guerilla tactics but with Lucie's joy in her Boubou and the details of daily life under the Nazi regime. In this, the 70th anniversary year of Charles de Gaulle's appeal to the French people to continue their fight against the occupying Germans, it is timely to review one of the most important books ever written about the Resistance. This site is like a library, you could find million book here by using search box in the widget. I told them, long ago, that he is my husband. The author, Lucie Aubrac 1912-2007 , tells her own story in diary format.

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Outwitting the Gestapo (Book, 1993) [www.socialinterview.com]

Outwitting the Gestapo

She told this small section of her fight in a very frank and personal way, with humor and wit and detail. It probably is well written in French but there are a few things that seem confusing or out of order. I was very impressed by the bravery of Lucie Aubrac and the other members of the French Resistance. The perilous deeds Lucie puts herself through in attempts to get her husband released are awesome in their bravery and ingenuity. At times, I had to go back and re-read a passage to absorb the enormity of a scene. More forms of resistance are described way beyond propagandizing, education, and recruitment and on into freeing prisoners, and other military operations. I think I might have the courage to fight in the moment of capture, to hit and kick and shoot even if I had a gun, but the courage to plan a sneak attack involving me crossing borders and bribing Nazis? Psh, I'll go on raids and rescue missions until I start having labor pains.

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Outwitting the Gestapo

Outwitting the Gestapo

Also, and this is just me. The book provides a panoramic history of Operation Dragoon and related events in France, Germany, Great Britain, the United States, and the Mediterranean from 1940-1945. Her book is also the basis for the 1997 French movie, Lucie Aubrac, which was released in the United States in 1999. A Woman and a Soldier covers the experiences of women in the military from the late mediaeval period to the present day. And when I was a teacher, I would freak out just from having to organize the permission slips. This never ending need to wait is reflected in the telling—for good and for bad. I have been so entrenched in the dark side of humanit Lucie Aburac, a history teacher, and her husband, Raymond, an engineer, decline an opportunity to further their studies in the United States to remian in German occupied France and help start the Reistance work under the Liberation Sud.


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Nonfiction Book Review: Outwitting the Gestapo by Lucie Aubrac, Author, Margaret Collins Wietz, Illustrator, Betsy Wing, Translator University of Nebraska Press $27.5 (241p) ISBN 978

Outwitting the Gestapo

And the real history of that period has sometimes been obscured by the post-war myths that grew up around the Resistance. Raymond was in prison sentenced to die for his participation in the Resistance. More forms of resistance a This is the third book I have read on the French Resistance, which I am finding to be a fascinating subject. Lucie Aubrac, the author of this autobiographical memoir, was French. The reason however becomes clear later in the book; Lucie views the attack as merely one of countless acts of resistance by the movement.

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The Canon: Outwitting the Gestapo by Lucie Aubrac

Outwitting the Gestapo

Despite her anguish, Aubrac tricked her husband's captors into meetings and masterminded an intricate rescue. The valuable and informative, fact heavy introduction by Margaret Collins Weitz should have been read slower. Outwitting the Gestapo is Lucie's harrowing account of her participation in the Resistance: of the months when, though pregnant, she planned and took part in raids to free comrades-including her husband, under Nazi death sentence-from the prisons of Klaus Barbie, the infamous Butcher of Lyon. Her book is also the basis for the 1997 French movie, Lucie Aubrac, which was released in the United States in 1999. Thank you Aubrac, for more than your memories.

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Outwitting the Gestapo by Lucie Aubrac

Outwitting the Gestapo

Nazis capture my Jewish husband? At this point the narrative becomes like a brilliant thriller as plans are made to attack the German convoy transporting her husband from Gestapo headquarters back to prison. Looking ahead to the present day, the book also examines how the French establishment and public have coped with the legacy of Vichy, and explains why the occupation is still ever present in French politics and everyday life. I felt guilty for thinking this of her. Also includes interesting tidbits regarding the organization of the multiple arms of the Resistance and the overall struggles against both the occupiers and the Vichy government. Nazis capture my Jewish husband? I do think it's worth reading. Most of it is focused on Lucie's attempt to free her imprisoned husband, along with anecdotes about encounters with various Resistance leaders, including Jean Moulin. This intelligence gathering, information sharing, and policy making was of course also greatly hampered not only by the political disagreements, but by the circumstances of war and occupation.

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Outwitting the Gestapo (Book, 1993) [www.socialinterview.com]

Outwitting the Gestapo

Lucie and her husband helped to establish Liberation-sud—a resistance group working from within Vichy, France, its aim being to fight Nazi occupation through sabotage and propaganda. The book takes place in France during 1943 when Lucie, despite being pregnant, was trying to get her husband out of a German-run prison in Lyon. I think a deal was struck there. Lucie Aburac, a history teacher, and her husband, Raymond, an engineer, decline an opportunity to further their studies in the United States to remian in German occupied France and help start the Reistance work under the Liberation Sud. A remarkable woman with a remarkable story. As the police delve into the doctor's past, a disturbing history of violence and corruption is uncovered. It is giving me a big picture of the breadth of the Resistance, both inside and outside of France, as well as in both occupied France and free France.

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