The Stone Roses: War and Peace. The Stone Roses: War and Peace by Simon Spence 2019-01-11

The Stone Roses: War and Peace Rating: 6,9/10 1265 reviews

The Stone Roses: War and Peace by Simon Spence

The Stone Roses: War and Peace

The book is very readable although input from the core band members is quite limited, relying on second hand sources for much of the bands quotes. He was firmly into the New Wave of British Heavy Metal scene. And my build-up for this concert was more than perfect. It was a recording that is still often listed as one of the best albums ever made. What I'm about to see at Wembley tomorrow is the best band I have ever seen and ever will with no doubt.

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Stone Roses: War and

The Stone Roses: War and Peace

I have to come clean and declare I've already done a couple of Top 10 style features for English publications: one made up of obscure Roses' gems and another gleaned from the list of 150. In the series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. As a result, by the end of it, I didn't feel I had learned more about the band members or - by extension - their music. I couldn't remember the guy's name. The Stone Roses were at the for This would have been a much better book if the band themselves were not so reticent about giving interviews. Pretty average as far as band biographies go. It's clear the author is a big fan, he's practically in love with Reni and is prepared to turn a blind eye to Ian Brown's foibles.


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The Stone Roses : war and peace (Book, 2013) [www.socialinterview.com]

The Stone Roses: War and Peace

It's less than 24 hours until my biggest gig in my life. They disbanded in turmoil in 1996. Even the band members themselves, over time, seemed to disagree. I was lucky enough to catch them at Finsbury Park in London on their comeback tour and it was a highlight for me musically, a true spectacle. Backstage the elated band was surprised to learn from their crew of the sound difficulties out front, as all they had felt was waves of love from the crowd. This book was, therefore, quite an education even though the band members generally did not cooperate with the author. I doubt that it has made his life easy.

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The Stone Roses: War and Peace by Simon Spence

The Stone Roses: War and Peace

With their incendiary aura the Roses became figureheads of the 'Madchester' movement. They thought their greatness would rise above bad contracts and management, but as time has told their years in court fighting sapped their creative power. Something that comes across if you read Peter Hook's books also and indeed Spence's own book on the Happy Mondays. It was clear their tastes were turning more rhythmic. Fascinating insight into the Stone Roses but the nerdy, over-detailed style meant it took me an age to get into this. As stated in the book 'It takes a lot of effort to look like there is no effort.

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The Stone Roses

The Stone Roses: War and Peace

For that reason, it falls short of Andrew Loog Oldham's memoirs also ghost-written by the same author. Arguably it is for the best that the Roses themselves remain an enigma. Spence charts all this meticulously and yet from Spike Island the book feels a little rushed but is never less than fascinating. I can't decide if I like this book or I just like the subject. But even from that I learned a lot about the band I never knew.


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The Stone Roses: War and Peace by Simon Spence

The Stone Roses: War and Peace

The same hubris that helped them make some of the best music of the time also led them down an all too familiar path in the music world. I was just a 1-year-old when the band split, but I am lucky enough to see them getting back together. In 1987, while releasing Sally Cinnamon, Brown was already talking about working with a dance producer. Again, Brown sprayed the title of this song on one of his scooters. You are entitled to your opinion, but I have always felt badly for Morrissey because of his inability to appropriately interact with most people. From the Manchester backwaters to the worldwide 2012 tour, War and Peace lays bare the irresistible tale of the last of the great bands.

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The Stone Roses: War and Peace by Simon Spence

The Stone Roses: War and Peace

In truth the glory days were over: the monarchy was safe, a tour of America would soon be cancelled, and plans to record a new album in the summer abandoned. All the triumphs and disasters are here' Sunday Times 'This really is definitive. The E-mail message field is required. Their Spike Island concert in 1990 was considered the pinnacle of their career though it was nearly their Altamont. By all accounts they are an extremely lazy, unorganised, arrogant band, but for a brief moment captured the zeitgeist, so a lot of people of my generation are prepared to give them a hell of a lot of slack. Their eponymous 1989 debut album is widely recognised as one of the best ever made. For unlimited access to every article in its entirety, including our archive of more than 10,000 pieces, we're asking for £3.

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The Stone Roses : war and peace (Book, 2013) [www.socialinterview.com]

The Stone Roses: War and Peace

From this pinnacle the unravelling was spectacular. From this pinnacle the unravelling was spectacular. It truly wasn't a quick rise to fame. Spence details, with steely, forensic precision, the story of the group's ascent, heyday and spectacular implosion. Originally planned in collaboration with Reni, the reclusive drummer, this book had been a year in the making when the Roses, against all odds, announced their re-formation. My son is an extreme introvert, and the daily social encounters that would be easy for the rest of us are nearly impossible for him; and people constantly mistake it for rudeness or arrogance.

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